A LOOK AT THE FLIGHT LOCKS

Living this close to the Welland Canal and the Flight Locks, we tend to take it somewhat for granted, much as we do with Niagara Falls. (I can’t help but think that some guy living near the Grand Canyon tells people, “What? That big hole in the ground? It’s just a pain in the butt to get around.”) Yet every year thousands come to the Falls to view this and, in the offing, many end up seeing the Welland Canal. Those haven’t seen this marvel are astounded.

There’s something about the technology that moves those giant doors that hold all that water. Although the Welland Canal runs 42 km (27 miles) from lake to lake, most of the heavy lifting is done among the Flight Locks and Lock 7, raising or lowering ships 42.5 metres (139.5 ft.) in that short distance.

Here are a few photos I’ve taken over the years. We in Thorold and about may have seen all of this, but many of these sights  tourists never see, largely because they’re off-season:

Looking north from the Lock 7 Centre.

Looking north from the Lock 7 Centre.

A view of Lock 6 from the south.

A ship sales south from Lock 7 on an early November evening.

A ship sales south from Lock 7 on an early November evening.

There are plenty of these bulk loaders.

There are plenty of these bulk loaders.

During the winter, after the locks have been drained, looking north toward Lock 5.

During the winter, after the locks have been drained, looking north toward Lock 5.

A closer look at the upper doors of the west side of Lock 5.

A closer look at the upper doors of the west side of Lock 5.

Still during the winter, a look through Lock 7 and out of the north (lower) doors.

Still during the winter, a look through Lock 7 and out of the north (lower) doors.

An ice jam above the doors to Lock 7.

An ice jam above the doors to Lock 7.

Lock 6 from the north.

Lock 6 from the north.

Lock 7 from the north.

Lock 7 from the north.

Lock 7 from the Lock 7 Centre (those pesky trees sometimes get in the way when they haven't been trimmed).

Lock 7 from the Lock 7 Centre (those pesky trees sometimes get in the way when they haven’t been trimmed).

The sub HMCS Ojibwa waiting to go through the next lock on its way to becomnig a museum in 2012.

The sub HMCS Ojibwa waiting to go through the next lock on its way to becomnig a museum in 2012.

HMCS Ojibwa in Lock 7.

HMCS Ojibwa in Lock 7.

5 thoughts on “A LOOK AT THE FLIGHT LOCKS

  1. Beautiful photographs. Too bad those in Council don’t really appreciate what they have. Every time I pass, the Tourist/Museum Office is closed, never saw the amount of traffic/tourists last year that always crowded at Lock 7, Amish, Israelis, Americans, Brits, people from all over the world and always, always, local Boatnerds happy to help them and brag about this treasure. There’s none so blind as those who won’t see.

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      • After much effort to get summer tourism up to what it was, change was not needed. Too bad those in power don’t apply their cost saving measures in so many other ways where it wouldn’t have such an adverse effect.

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    • I have lived in Port Robinson for 30 years…can see the ships passing by from my back yard…it’s always fascinating…it never gets old! Yes,Tony…it is a great photo essay that you put together!!

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